Huntington’s disease research news. In plain language. Written by scientists. For the global HD community.

Are you looking for our logo? You can download our logo and get information about how to use it on our sharing page

Articles with the topic: animal-model

Has a "wonder drug" for dementia been discovered? (Spoiler alert: no.)

Has a "wonder drug" for dementia been discovered? (Spoiler alert: no.)

Dr Michael Flower on May 07, 2017

If media reports of a "wonder-drug" that could "stop all neurodegenerative brain diseases, including dementia” seem too good to be true, that's because they are. The truth behind the headlines is that researchers tested thousands of already-licensed drugs in worms, and a couple that went on to show beneficial effects in mouse models of two rare forms of dementia. While it gives researchers two new leads, this research doesn't prove anything about these drugs in patients with neurodegenerative diseases, and has virtually nothing to do with Huntington's disease at all.

Enemy at the gates – huntingtin disrupts nuclear transport

Enemy at the gates – huntingtin disrupts nuclear transport

Tom Peskett on April 21, 2017

Exciting new studies provide evidence that a particular kind of cellular trafficking goes awry in Huntington's Disease. Specifically, researchers have learned that traffic in and out of the cells control center - the nucleus - breaks down in HD. These findings open up new avenues for HD research.

Sheep leading the flock: metabolism and biomarkers in HD

Sheep leading the flock: metabolism and biomarkers in HD

Leora Fox on March 27, 2017

Beyond affecting movement, mood, and thinking, HD involves a complex set of changes to the body that can be difficult to predict in different individuals. Recently, researchers were able to identify consistent early changes in metabolism by studying a group of HD sheep. This large animal model is helping scientists to track altered substances in the blood that could predict HD progression and response to treatment.

Important advances in next generation genome editing tools for Huntington's Disease

Important advances in next generation genome editing tools for Huntington's Disease

Mr. Shawn Minnig on October 31, 2016

Recent days have seen a slew of news emerging regarding the use of something called genome editing as a potential therapy for genetic diseases like Huntington's Disease. These approaches, which include exotic sounding tools like zinc finger nucleases and CRISPR/Cas9, differ from more traditional ways reducing the impact of the HD mutation on cells. What's new in this exciting area of research?

Early exposure to the HD protein may cause life-long symptoms

Early exposure to the HD protein may cause life-long symptoms

Mr. Shawn Minnig on June 28, 2016

When the ‘healthy’ HD gene functions as it should, one of its many jobs is in the development of normal embryos. Researchers have long assumed that the ‘mutant’ HD gene inherited by people with HD is still able to do this job, since HD patients develop normally and don’t show signs until later in life. A surprising new finding suggests we may have to think carefully about this assumption!

Harnessing the power of viruses to treat Huntington's disease

Harnessing the power of viruses to treat Huntington's disease

Leora Fox on February 03, 2016

New therapies for disorders like Huntington’s disease are on the way, but getting the drugs to enter brain cells can be a major challenge. A group of scientists has redesigned and tested a harmless virus that can efficiently deliver a 'gene silencing' message throughout the brain in mice, much further than naturally occurring viruses can reach. What's more, it can be given with a simple injection into the blood, offering great potential for research in gene silencing research and beyond.

A recycled drug gives us new insight in to HD

A recycled drug gives us new insight in to HD

Leora Fox on December 15, 2015

Researchers have found a connection between HD and an energy-regulating protein called PPAR-delta. Giving PPAR-delta a boost with an existing drug was protective in HD cells and mice, but we’ll likely need to research and test it further before it can go to the HD clinic.

Novel research technique suggests an antioxidant gene protects vulnerable neurons

Novel research technique suggests an antioxidant gene protects vulnerable neurons

Leora Fox on April 06, 2015

Researchers have developed a new technique that allows them to screen for genes that could contribute to the progression of Huntington’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. This is the first time this is possible in the mammalian central nervous system. They used the technique in an HD mouse to uncover an antioxidant gene, Gpx6, which is protective to neurons.

Building a Better Mouse(trap): A New Model of Huntington’s Disease

Building a Better Mouse(trap): A New Model of Huntington’s Disease

Melissa Christianson on March 16, 2015

Most research on Huntington’s disease is done using animal models that mimic the human disease. However, these models typically recreate only a few of the disease’s symptoms, and there are some important symptoms that don’t show up in any model at all. Now, exciting new research is making great strides against these problems – and teaching us about the disease at the same time.