Articles with the topic: gene-silencing

EuroBuzz News: Day 2

EuroBuzz News: Day 2

EuroBuzz news: Day 2. Ed and Jeff reporting from the European Huntington’s Disease Network 2012 meeting in Stockholm

Professor Ed WildSeptember 15, 2012

ASO gene silencing reaches further, lasts longer

ASO gene silencing reaches further, lasts longer

Silencing the Huntingtin gene using ASO drugs reaches further, lasts longer and is safe. Human trial soon?

Dr Nayana LahiriJune 21, 2012

Mutant yeast highlights crucial CAG-reading protein

Mutant yeast highlights crucial CAG-reading protein

A new job for a DNA-reading protein called SPT4 - controlling the balance of mutant and healthy huntingtin protein

Professor Ed WildMarch 14, 2012

HD Therapeutics Conference 2012 Updates: Day 2

HD Therapeutics Conference 2012 Updates: Day 2

Day 2 of our coverage of the Huntington's Disease Therapeutics Conference

Professor Ed WildMarch 01, 2012

Double success for huntingtin RNAi gene silencing

Double success for huntingtin RNAi gene silencing

2 bits of good news for RNAi gene silencing in HD: it's safe over six months, and a way to treat bigger brain areas

Professor Ed WildJanuary 24, 2012

Safety trials add crucial piece to gene silencing jigsaw

Safety trials add crucial piece to gene silencing jigsaw

Three trials of drugs to 'silence' the HD gene in monkeys show they hit the target safely. Human trials coming soon.

Professor Ed WildNovember 14, 2011

HD just got cilia

HD just got cilia

Huntington's disease just got cilia: huntingtin protein affects tiny but important hairs on cells called cilia

Dr Jeff CarrollOctober 11, 2011

Gene silencing takes a targeted step forward

Gene silencing takes a targeted step forward

Targeting the mutant Huntington's disease gene for silencing, while leaving the healthy gene untouched

Dr Michael OrthOctober 07, 2011

A back-to-front hidden message in the HD gene?

A back-to-front hidden message in the HD gene?

Unzip your genes! A backwards message, hidden in the 'backup DNA' of the Huntington's disease gene... what does it me

Professor Ed WildAugust 19, 2011