Huntington’s disease research news. In plain language. Written by scientists. For the global HD community.

Are you looking for our logo? You can download our logo and get information about how to use it on our sharing page

Articles with the topic: aggregates

Has a "wonder drug" for dementia been discovered? (Spoiler alert: no.)

Has a "wonder drug" for dementia been discovered? (Spoiler alert: no.)

Dr Michael Flower on May 07, 2017

If media reports of a "wonder-drug" that could "stop all neurodegenerative brain diseases, including dementia” seem too good to be true, that's because they are. The truth behind the headlines is that researchers tested thousands of already-licensed drugs in worms, and a couple that went on to show beneficial effects in mouse models of two rare forms of dementia. While it gives researchers two new leads, this research doesn't prove anything about these drugs in patients with neurodegenerative diseases, and has virtually nothing to do with Huntington's disease at all.

Enemy at the gates – huntingtin disrupts nuclear transport

Enemy at the gates – huntingtin disrupts nuclear transport

Tom Peskett on April 21, 2017

Exciting new studies provide evidence that a particular kind of cellular trafficking goes awry in Huntington's Disease. Specifically, researchers have learned that traffic in and out of the cells control center - the nucleus - breaks down in HD. These findings open up new avenues for HD research.

Huntingtin takes a trip: harmful proteins pass between brain cells

Huntingtin takes a trip: harmful proteins pass between brain cells

Leora Fox on June 06, 2016

Clumps of mutant huntingtin protein in brain cells are a hallmark of HD, and they build up slowly, occupying more and more cells over time. Recent research in mice shows that the harmful proteins can travel between neurons, setting off a chain reaction that leads to more sick cells and the development of symptoms.

A Few Bad Seeds: Using Brain Fluid to Grow Clumps in Brain Cells

A Few Bad Seeds: Using Brain Fluid to Grow Clumps in Brain Cells

Melissa Christianson on September 15, 2015

It’s like gardening gone wrong: scientists can sprinkle Huntington’s protein on the outside of laboratory-grown brain cells and make sticky, potentially harmful protein clumps grow inside the cells. Now, new research showing that human brain fluid does the same thing could help us monitor Huntington's disease.

Should we worry about a huntingtin invasion?

Should we worry about a huntingtin invasion?

Dr Jeff Carroll on October 27, 2014

New work in brain diseases like Alzheimer's suggests that brain cells called neurons might be 'catching' the sickness from their neighbors. A recently published paper suggests that, in very specific lab conditions, this might also happen in Huntington's disease. What does this mean for what we know about HD, and how to treat it?

Going toe-to-toe with tau: new insights into the chemical basis of Huntington’s disease

Going toe-to-toe with tau: new insights into the chemical basis of Huntington’s disease

Siddharth Nath on September 13, 2014

We know that the cause of Huntington's disease is a genetic change, resulting a harmful protein: mutant huntingtin. But other proteins can get dragged into the fray and contribute to the problems faced by HD-affected cells. New research suggests that a rather notorious protein, called 'tau' – a known troublemaker in other degenerative brain diseases – builds up and causes damage in HD.

Jumping genes: Huntington's disease protein invades brain transplants

Jumping genes: Huntington's disease protein invades brain transplants

Dr Jeff Carroll on May 26, 2014

Huntington's disease is caused by the malfunctioning and early death of brain cells. Replacing those dead and dying cells with stem cells has long been a goal of some HD scientists. A new study investigates the long-term health of some of the earliest cell transplants into HD patient brains — and finds a surprising result.

Raptor announces results of cysteamine trial for Huntington's disease

Raptor announces results of cysteamine trial for Huntington's disease

Dr Jeff Carroll on April 10, 2014

A chemical called cysteamine has long been of interest as a potential therapy for Huntington's disease. Now, Raptor Pharmaceuticals has announced the interim results of a study of cysteamine in HD patients. The trial failed to meet its pre-specified goal, but there are some interesting details in the data suggesting the ongoing trial deserves attention.

Sleep, cilia and HD

Sleep, cilia and HD

Graham Easton on March 06, 2014

Studies have shown that HD patients tend to get less efficient sleep, fewer hours of sleep, and wake up more times during the night. However, sleep in Huntington’s is under-researched because historically scientists have investigated HD as a disease of movement impairment, and sleep problems don’t seem to have anything to do with movement impairment.