Huntington’s disease research news. In plain language. Written by scientists. For the global HD community.

Are you looking for our logo? You can download our logo and get information about how to use it on our sharing page
Welcome to HDBuzz

Welcome to HDBuzz

Dr Ed Wild on January 18, 2011

HDBuzz is now live! Your source for Huntington’s disease research news, in plain language, written by scientists, for the global HD community. Reliable, impartial and free to share, HDBuzz will bring you solid reasons to have hope, by explaining latest news from the worldwide effort to find effective treatments for HD.

Memantine in HD: dose is everything

Memantine in HD: dose is everything

Dr Jeff Carroll on January 15, 2011

A drug used to treat the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease might be beneficial in HD through altering the balance of good and bad messages coming into neurons. New research in HD mice suggests that low doses of memantine might be best, and hopefully a planned trial of low-dose memantine in HD patients will give us the answer.

An active lifestyle may make a difference to HD symptoms

An active lifestyle may make a difference to HD symptoms

Deepti Babu on January 10, 2011

We all know that exercise and staying active are good for everyone, whether or not they are at risk of developing HD. A new study of lifestyle activities in people with the HD mutation suggests that staying active is even more important in HD, and that passive habits – especially during the teenage years – might be one factor that can cause earlier onset of HD symptoms.

Frequently asked questions, January 2011

Frequently asked questions, January 2011

Dr Ed Wild on January 07, 2011

The first in a monthly series of FAQ articles covering hot topics and burning issues in the science behind HD.

Getting the data out – a new scientific journal just for HD

Getting the data out – a new scientific journal just for HD

Dr Michael Orth on January 04, 2011

The search for better treatments for HD requires a lot of effort by researchers across the globe. Time is of the essence: the ideal time for a treatment for HD is yesterday. Scientific findings need to be made available sooner rather than later, so that others can build on what is already known. PLoS Currents HD is a new journal launched to speed up the process of scientific discovery in HD.

Dimebon: disappointing in Alzheimer’s but might work in HD

Dimebon: disappointing in Alzheimer’s but might work in HD

Dr Jeff Carroll on December 23, 2010

Dimebon, a drug developed in Russia as an anti-allergy medication, is under investigation as a possible treatment to improve thinking problems in HD. There was disappointment when a recent large trial of Dimebon to treat Alzheimer’s disease in the USA showed no benefit, but hope remains in HD where the DIMOND trial is continuing across Europe.

Focused drug screening leads to improved drugs to increase the rate of cellular recycling

Focused drug screening leads to improved drugs to increase the rate of cellular recycling

Dr Jeff Carroll on December 16, 2010

Build-up of unwanted chemicals in cells is one way the HD mutation causes damage to neurons. A cellular recycling process called autophagy is crucial to getting rid of these harmful chemicals. Now researchers have found a way of identifying safe drugs that can increase the rate of garbage disposal in HD.

Does HD cause brains to develop differently?

Does HD cause brains to develop differently?

Dr Jeff Carroll on December 06, 2010

It has long been known that HD causes brain shrinkage that can be detected using MRI scanning. But new findings from the PREDICT-HD study suggest that the brains of men with the HD might never reach the same size as the brains of people without the mutation during development. That suggests that the HD mutation might be exerting its effects even earlier than we thought.

Are there genetic connections between neurodegenerative diseases?

Are there genetic connections between neurodegenerative diseases?

Dr Jeff Carroll on December 01, 2010

A group of researchers working on ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease) in yeast cells have found an unexpected genetic link between ALS and SCA-2, a disease in the same genetic family as HD. New links between these diseases might reveal new ways of approaching the search for treatments for diseases like HD.