Huntington’s disease research news. In plain language. Written by scientists. For the global HD community.

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Articles with the topic: huntingtin-function

Ultra-rare mutations highlight the importance of the HD gene in brain development

Ultra-rare mutations highlight the importance of the HD gene in brain development

Megan Krench on August 29, 2016

A relatively new technology called exome sequencing has identified a few families with novel mutations in their HD genes. These are different than the mutation that causes HD, but allow researchers to better understand the normal role of the HD gene.

Huntington's Disease Therapeutics Conference 2016 - day 1

Huntington's Disease Therapeutics Conference 2016 - day 1

Dr Ed Wild on February 25, 2016

If it's February, that means the the world's leading scientists are converging on Palm Springs for the annual HD therapeutics conference!

Buzzilia Video: Day 1

Buzzilia Video: Day 1

Dr Jeff Carroll on October 09, 2013

We present Buzzilia, video 1: news highlights and in-depth interviews with top HD researchers from the World Congress on Huntington's disease 2013 in Rio de Janeiro. On the opening day of the Congress, Jeff and Ed review the major developments since the last World Congress in 2011, and talk to Prof Elena Cattaneo from Milan, Italy, about the huntingtin protein.

Video feature: Huntington's disease research... in space!

Video feature: Huntington's disease research... in space!

Dr Ed Wild on September 27, 2013

The huntingtin protein, which in its mutant form causes Huntington's disease, is difficult to study because it forms clumps rather than neat crystals. Now, young HD researcher Gwen Owens of California Institute of Technology is reaching VERY high to try to crack the problem. In a special video interview screened at the recent HD World Congress, HDBuzz spoke to Gwen about her 'out-of-this-world' plans...

Does a 'rusty hinge' cause Huntington's disease?

Does a 'rusty hinge' cause Huntington's disease?

Dr Ed Wild on August 27, 2013

Figuring out how the mutant huntingtin protein causes damage is the central problem of Huntington's disease research. Now a team of Canadian researchers led by Dr Ray Truant has shown that the protein has an important 'hinge' function, which works less well in cells with the HD mutation. Exciting stuff, but contrary to what you might have read, it doesn't mean we no longer need to study mice!

Splicing with danger: a new way of thinking about the harmful Huntington's disease protein

Splicing with danger: a new way of thinking about the harmful Huntington's disease protein

Dr Tamara Maiuri on May 06, 2013

Researchers are hard at work figuring out exactly how the expanded Huntington's disease gene causes harm. Recent work from a UK group has uncovered another clue to help solve the mystery. It turns out that faulty processing of the huntingtin 'recipe' produces a short, harmful fragment of the huntingtin protein.

HD Therapeutics Conference 2013 Updates: Day 1

HD Therapeutics Conference 2013 Updates: Day 1

Dr Jeff Carroll on April 09, 2013

Our first daily report from the annual Huntington's Disease Therapeutics Conference in Venice, Italy. We'll be bringing you live updates via Twitter over the next two days. You can use HDBuzz.net, comment on Facebook or tweet @HDBuzzFeed to send us questions, comments and queries.

Gone fishing:  protein network screen identifies new therapeutic targets in Huntington's disease

Gone fishing: protein network screen identifies new therapeutic targets in Huntington's disease

Carly Desmond on January 18, 2013

The mutant huntingtin protein doesn't do damage in isolation - all proteins work in connected networks. Researchers at the California Buck Institute for Research on Aging have conducted a large-scale screen to identify protein networks that may be acting to relieve or worsen the harmful effects of the Huntington's disease mutation. Could manipulating these networks offer new therapeutic options for HD?

'Guard dog' proteins reveal surprising connections between Huntington's disease and other brain disorders

'Guard dog' proteins reveal surprising connections between Huntington's disease and other brain disorders

Melissa Christianson on January 10, 2013

DNA/RNA-binding proteins, a fancy type of protein that 'guards' the genetic instructions running brain cells, are known to be important in diseases like Alzheimer's and motor neuron disease. New research suggests that these proteins could be key players - and lead to new treatment options - in Huntington's disease as well.