Huntington’s disease research news. In plain language. Written by scientists. For the global HD community.

Are you looking for our logo? You can download our logo and get information about how to use it on our sharing page

Featured article

Largest creatine clinical trial for Huntington's disease halted after 'futility' analysis

Largest creatine clinical trial for Huntington's disease halted after 'futility' analysis

Dr Ed Wild on October 29, 2014

CREST-E, the largest clinical trial of the dietary supplement creatine, has been terminated early because an early analysis of the results to date showed there was no realistic chance it could show positive results. This provides compelling evidence that creatine doesn't slow down progression in Huntington's disease patients.

Latest news

Should we worry about a huntingtin invasion?

Should we worry about a huntingtin invasion?

Dr Jeff Carroll on October 27, 2014

New work in brain diseases like Alzheimer's suggests that brain cells called neurons might be 'catching' the sickness from their neighbors. A recently published paper suggests that, in very specific lab conditions, this might also happen in Huntington's disease. What does this mean for what we know about HD, and how to treat it?

EuroBuzz 2014 Video, day two

EuroBuzz 2014 Video, day two

Dr Jeff Carroll on October 10, 2014

Ed and Jeff present the second day's science at the EHDN meeting in Barcelona. Features a clinical trials roundup, an exclusive interview with Prof Sarah Tabrizi about the first trial of a huntingtin lowering 'gene silencing' drug, and a surprise for EHDN president Prof Bernhard Landwehrmeyer.

EuroBuzz 2014 Video, day one

EuroBuzz 2014 Video, day one

Dr Ed Wild on October 10, 2014

We present the video of Ed and Jeff's review of first day's science at the European HD Network meeting in Barcelona.

Melatonin alterations in Huntington's disease help explain trouble with sleep

Melatonin alterations in Huntington's disease help explain trouble with sleep

Leora Fox on October 07, 2014

Many people with Huntington's disease have problems sleeping. Sleep-wake cycles are controlled in part by melatonin, a hormone that makes you drowsy at bedtime. Scientists in London measured melatonin levels in HD patients, gene carriers, and unaffected individuals and found changes in the levels and timing of melatonin release. This could help to explain the sleep disruptions that occur in HD.

EuroBuzz 2014: day three

EuroBuzz 2014: day three

Dr Ed Wild on September 21, 2014

Our final report from the European HD Network meeting. For the first time, video of many presentations, including our 'EuroBuzz' sessions will be made available online shortly.

EuroBuzz 2014: day two

EuroBuzz 2014: day two

Dr Jeff Carroll on September 20, 2014

Here's Ed and Jeff's live Twitter report from the second day of the EHDN 2014 meeting. Our final report will be tomorrow, and we'll be uploading video of our onstage roundup sessions soon.

EuroBuzz 2014: day one

EuroBuzz 2014: day one

Dr Ed Wild on September 19, 2014

Join Jeff and Ed as we tweet live from the 2014 European Huntington's Disease Network meeting in Barcelona! Exciting science ahead!

Going toe-to-toe with tau: new insights into the chemical basis of Huntington’s disease

Going toe-to-toe with tau: new insights into the chemical basis of Huntington’s disease

Siddharth Nath on September 13, 2014

We know that the cause of Huntington's disease is a genetic change, resulting a harmful protein: mutant huntingtin. But other proteins can get dragged into the fray and contribute to the problems faced by HD-affected cells. New research suggests that a rather notorious protein, called 'tau' – a known troublemaker in other degenerative brain diseases – builds up and causes damage in HD.

New results bring BDNF therapies into focus

New results bring BDNF therapies into focus

Dr Jeff Carroll on August 18, 2014

Cells in the brain depend on support from one another to stay alive. Nutrients called trophic factors act like brain fertilizer, keeping neighboring brain cells healthy. This process has long been thought to go wrong in HD, and exciting new mouse research paints a very clear picture of exactly what's happening.