Huntington’s disease research news. In plain language. Written by scientists. For the global HD community.

Are you looking for our logo? You can download our logo and get information about how to use it on our sharing page
HDBuzz cofounder Dr Jeff Carroll gave the keynote address at the 2015 Huntington's Disease Therapeutics Conference. Watch the video here

Latest news

Novel research technique suggests an antioxidant gene protects vulnerable neurons

Novel research technique suggests an antioxidant gene protects vulnerable neurons

Leora Fox on April 06, 2015

Researchers have developed a new technique that allows them to screen for genes that could contribute to the progression of Huntington’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. This is the first time this is possible in the mammalian central nervous system. They used the technique in an HD mouse to uncover an antioxidant gene, Gpx6, which is protective to neurons.

Building a Better Mouse(trap): A New Model of Huntington’s Disease

Building a Better Mouse(trap): A New Model of Huntington’s Disease

Melissa Christianson on March 16, 2015

Most research on Huntington’s disease is done using animal models that mimic the human disease. However, these models typically recreate only a few of the disease’s symptoms, and there are some important symptoms that don’t show up in any model at all. Now, exciting new research is making great strides against these problems – and teaching us about the disease at the same time.

Taking new targets to the bank: the DNA repair protein ‘ATM’ is overactive in Huntington's disease

Taking new targets to the bank: the DNA repair protein ‘ATM’ is overactive in Huntington's disease

Terry Jo Bichell on March 09, 2015

A recent study by the Yang lab at UCLA points to a new idea for preventing damage to neurons in Huntington’s disease. The strategy is to tone down an overly helpful protein called ATM. Inside neurons, ATM provides a crucial role in repairing the cell’s infrastructure, somewhat like that of a bridge inspector, but the expanded HD protein may be causing ATM to misjudge DNA damage.

2015 Huntington's Disease Therapeutics Conference: Day 3

2015 Huntington's Disease Therapeutics Conference: Day 3

Dr Jeff Carroll on March 03, 2015

Our final report from the Annual Huntington's Disease Therapeutics Conference.

2015 Huntington's Disease Therapeutics Conference: Day 2

2015 Huntington's Disease Therapeutics Conference: Day 2

Dr Jeff Carroll on February 26, 2015

Our second update from the Annual Huntington's Disease Therapeutics Conference.

2015 Huntington's Disease Therapeutics Conference: Day 1

2015 Huntington's Disease Therapeutics Conference: Day 1

Dr Ed Wild on February 25, 2015

The first of our special reports from the Annual Huntington's Disease Therapeutics Conference in Palm Springs – the biggest meeting of HD scientists focused on developing treatments to prevent or slow Huntington's disease.

Unlocking the Potential of Antibodies as a Therapy for Huntington’s Disease

Unlocking the Potential of Antibodies as a Therapy for Huntington’s Disease

Lakshini Mendis on February 18, 2015

The growth factor 'BDNF' usually sends a “Survive!” signal to brain cells. In Huntington’s Disease (HD), this system doesn’t work as it should, so scientists have been looking for ways to boost the signal. Enter one of nature’s most useful tools: the antibody. Usually antibodies play an important role in the immune system, but researchers have identified two antibodies, produced by the company Pfizer, that can act like a set of spare keys to activate the TrkB receptor. This unlocks the door to determining whether a boost in TrkB activity is enough to prevent neurons from dying, in hopes of slowing the progression of HD.

Drug Improves Huntington’s Symptoms in Mice – and Their Offspring

Drug Improves Huntington’s Symptoms in Mice – and Their Offspring

Melissa Christianson on February 09, 2015

In Huntington’s Disease, one of the many problems arising from the disease mutation is that DNA gets folded incorrectly. A new study in mice reveals that a drug changing the way DNA folds may have beneficial effects in Huntington’s – even for the untreated offspring of treated individuals. This discovery could affect how we think about drug therapies for Huntington’s Disease.

mTORC1 tips the scales in Huntington’s disease mice

mTORC1 tips the scales in Huntington’s disease mice

Joseph Ochaba on January 27, 2015

What happens when you have a broken part in a machine? You fix it! A new study shows that increasing the activity a critical piece of machinery called ‘mTORC1’ in a mouse model of Huntington’s disease leads to improved motor problems and brain abnormalities associated with the disease. These recently published findings may offer scientists a new target for therapeutic development in HD.