Huntington’s disease research news. In plain language. Written by scientists. For the global HD community.

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Articles with the topic: biomarkers

Huntington's Disease Therapeutics Conference 2016 - day 2

Huntington's Disease Therapeutics Conference 2016 - day 2

Dr Jeff Carroll on February 28, 2016

After an exciting day of science yesterday, day 2 saw updates on strategies to rid cells of the harmful mutant huntingtin protein and exciting reports on current and planned clinical trials.

Through a Broader Lens: Looking at Non-Motor Symptoms in HD

Through a Broader Lens: Looking at Non-Motor Symptoms in HD

Melissa Christianson on January 25, 2016

Common depictions of HD emphasizing only its movement symptoms paint an incomplete picture of the real disease. HD causes both motor and non-motor symptoms that, together, affect the entire body. Now, scientists are using a broader lens to explore this full set of HD symptoms and determine how symptoms might be related in the disease.

A Few Bad Seeds: Using Brain Fluid to Grow Clumps in Brain Cells

A Few Bad Seeds: Using Brain Fluid to Grow Clumps in Brain Cells

Melissa Christianson on September 15, 2015

It’s like gardening gone wrong: scientists can sprinkle Huntington’s protein on the outside of laboratory-grown brain cells and make sticky, potentially harmful protein clumps grow inside the cells. Now, new research showing that human brain fluid does the same thing could help us monitor Huntington's disease.

Measuring harmful huntingtin protein in the brain’s bath water

Measuring harmful huntingtin protein in the brain’s bath water

Dr Michael Orth on May 18, 2015

Exciting technologies such as gene silencing are being developed for the treatment of Huntington’s disease. Aside from waiting for disease progression to take place, how will we know whether they are working? This has been a major hurdle for HD researchers, but we now have a super-sensitive method to measure the build-up of harmful huntingtin protein in the nervous systems of HD patients.

Lighting the way: A new biomarker for Huntington’s disease

Lighting the way: A new biomarker for Huntington’s disease

Melissa Christianson on April 20, 2015

In Huntington’s disease, brain cells begin dying long before disease symptoms arise. Unfortunately, good tools for monitoring early brain changes – and testing whether new therapies slow or stop them – have not previously been available. However, a newly developed tool aiming to overcome this problem may mean big changes for the way we track Huntington’s disease.

The sweet lowdown: Huntington's disease brains use sugar differently

The sweet lowdown: Huntington's disease brains use sugar differently

Dr Jeff Carroll on October 11, 2013

The brain is a very hungry organ, but does it consume energy differently in Huntington's disease? A team led by David Eidelberg of the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research has been studying the patterns of energy consumption in the brains of people carrying the HD mutation. Changes in how much sugar the brain uses are seen even before the brain starts to change physically, suggesting this might be a useful thing to track in HD clinical trials.

Landmark study puts Huntington's disease trials on TRACK

Landmark study puts Huntington's disease trials on TRACK

Dr Faye Begeti on May 09, 2013

If we find a therapy that we hope can slow down Huntington's disease, how can we prove that it works in patients? What tests should we do and how long should we follow people up after treatment in order to see any real benefits? A major new paper from Sarah Tabrizi and colleagues, reporting the final outcomes of the TRACK-HD study, provides information that will help us better design trials of new therapies in HD as well as understand how the disease progresses.

Proposed Huntington's disease 'biomarker' is not useful, new study suggests

Proposed Huntington's disease 'biomarker' is not useful, new study suggests

Dr Jeff Carroll on April 25, 2013

A specific kind of damage called 'oxidative stress' may contribute to cells getting sick and dying in Huntington's disease. Previous reports had suggested that blood levels of a chemical marker of oxidative stress could be a 'biomarker' for HD clinical trials. But a newly-published work strongly suggests that it isn't a useful biomarker after all. Is this bad news?

HD Therapeutics Conference 2013 Updates: Day 3

HD Therapeutics Conference 2013 Updates: Day 3

Dr Jeff Carroll on April 11, 2013

Our daily report from the annual Huntington's Disease Therapeutics Conference in Venice, Italy on the third and final day of the conference.